1. But if news is a piece of informational clothing and reacting to news is part of a personal display on a site running an algorithm, what does it mean when we notice how few Wikipedia articles about Africa are geo-tagged from Africa and how few languages from Africa are represented on Wikipedia? When’s the last time you heard bits of Akan or Bambara described on the evening news? What does it mean when these items aren’t part of an algorithm or a personal display?

    Which brings us to the point Sandvig, Karahalios, and Langbort walked up to the edge of: how do you conduct an algorithm audit of a news feed? How do you do ‘editorial pentesting’ during a war? And what does all this mean when looking at the unfolding war between Israel, Hamas, and the people of Gaza stuck in the middle?

    To Share News Of A War, The Latest, On Facebook.

     
  2. Eid Mubarak.

    (via.)

     
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  5. Alexis Madrigal posed a fascinating question on twitter a few days ago that I tried to help solve. Check it out.

     

  6. "In the kind of town that lived its life like a jar that had once been filled with quarters and guess how many were inside and had since been replaced with an after-cricket, after-spring-peeper echo with maybe a hear-the-glass-jar-ping sort of ping, I sat in a quiet car and imagined a quiet beach with maybe a glimpse of a dog on the horizon."
     
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  8. "Some of the richest artists on the planet — by some estimates — include Georg Baselitz, Chuck Close, David Hockney, Gerald Richter, Anish Kapoor, Takashi Murakami, Jeff Koons, Damien Hurst, and Jasper Johns. I would like to see them paint children’s faces. Together. For free."
    — Artetorial.
     

  9. "Lightning flailed about the earth’s surface searching for a tree the way an incompetent boxer searched for his opponent’s chin."
     

  10. "Death wanted Beethoven to sit for a death mask. Beethoven asked whether or not he should cross his legs for it. It’s a death mask, Death replied. You don’t have to — why would you — and pigeons swooped passed the window."
     

  11. X: Did you see the news report of another spy in Germany?

    Me: You mean there’s TWO?

     

  12. Finally saw the “Turned Down For What” music video, and — I was friends in college with the first girl the kid crashes through the ceiling and startles. (And — I just learned — I was friends with one of the co-directors, too. In fact, you can see us dancing a literal jig in a video from that time period here.)

    And let’s not even talk about the guy in the Michael Jordan/kittens commercial.

     
  13. From early this morning.

     

  14. The very nice Ted Scheinman quotes me (and others) in a nice piece on writer’s block in Pacific Standard.

     

  15. perzadook said: When you think about linguistics, in the most general sense, what comes to mind? Birds? Recursion? Stuff?

    Right now? Probably how the cultural dimension of neo-Whorfianism — that language shapes who you are and how you see the world — makes total sense (to a degree), but how — from a ‘true’ linguistic standpoint — it’s thorough (and deserved) bunk, and how funny that is, and how there’s no real bridge between the two (that I can currently think of, at least.)

    Though — yes — birds. And — you know — stuff. And the guy with the thing. And the who’s-it. And the what’s-it. And the cat in the cradle and the silver